The Big 12 is a championship league

The NCAA has crowned national champions in 21 sports (Division 1A only)  this year through the fall and winter seasons.

Three championships have been won by Big 12 schools as Oklahoma State (men’s cross country), Texas A&M (women’s basketball) and Colorado (skiing) brought home big plaques.

The Pac-10 has won more titles (five) than any other league so far.

After watching the Oklahoma State men’s golf team through two rounds of the Big 12 Championship this week, it would appear the Cowboys are poised to add another jewel to their trophy case.

OSU leads the conference tournament by 12 strokes entering today’s final round and they feature the world’s #1-rated amateur (Peter Uihlein) and the son of PGA TOUR pro Bob Tway.

The Okie State men’s golfers are not the only Big 12 spring sport ranked first nationally at the present time. Texas A&M has the nation’s #1-ranked track & field teams in both the men’s and women’s polls.

Our Big 12 Conference got a recent boost with its new second-tier television rights deal. The TV deal compares favorably with any in college athletics.

Judging by fall and winter results along with current ratings, the Big 12′s championship pursuits also rate pretty highly among its peer leagues.

Reader feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me on Twitter at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

Renderings for new video board released later today

The first signs of site preparation for the support structure of the new video display board at Jack Trice Stadium appeared this week as fencing along the side of the Jacobson Athletic Building was removed.

Later this morning, Iowa State Athletics will share a handful of renderings and display board options for the scoreboard being installed at Jack Trice Stadium this off-season.

The top of the video display will be taller than the height of 10 basketball hoops piled on top of each other.

The size of the video display will be five times larger than the current board.

The pillars of the support structure will measure 8 feet wide and 14 feet deep.

The length of the structure will be 1/3 longer than the present press tower at the stadium.

The holes – about to be drilled in the ground – to hold the support structure will be 65 feet deep.

Be sure to check cyclones.com later today to review project details and get a sense of what the end product may look like.

Reader feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me on Twitter at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

 

 

Iowa Corn: perfect partner for unique series

Corn

There isn’t a more logical partner than the Iowa Corn Growers Association to sponsor the annual all-sports competition between Iowa State and Iowa.

Our state has produced more corn than any other for 14 consecutive years. We grow more corn than most countries. Corn has been our state’s leading crop for more than 150 years. Or, at least, that’s the claim.

Officials from Iowa Corn joined Athletics Director Jamie Pollard Tuesday to announce a three-way partnership between Iowa Corn and the athletics departments at ISU and UI.

Iowa Corn agreed to sponsor one of college sports best rivalries. The competition between the Cyclones and Hawkeyes is unique in that it features two schools in the same state but from different conferences.

There are similar rivalries in the Big 12 [Oklahoma / Oklahoma State (Bedlam Series), Texas / Texas A&M (Lone Star Showdown) and Missouri / Kansas (Border Showdown Series)] and Big Ten [Wisconsin / Minnesota (Border Battle) and Indiana / Purdue (Crimson and Gold Cup)].

And, there are others across the nation. But, when Iowa State and Iowa meet it’s more than school pride at stake. There are also conference bragging rights on the line.

In Division 1A football, the only longer running (more than three decades) in-state football series between schools in different conferences are: Georgia vs. Georgia Tech, Clemson vs. South Carolina and Florida State vs. both Miami and Florida.

 

Iowa State vs. Iowa is in pretty select company

Hy-Vee started the fun in 2004-05 and, under their sponsorship, the schools have alternated victories in an all-sports series every year. It’s been a good competition.

Iowa Corn has plans to add new elements to the series. Those items will be unveiled in the coming months. Stay tuned. It promises to be fun.

Email feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow
 

Expanded Tailgate Tour starts in a month

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If you live in the state of Iowa, there’s a good chance that the Cyclones’ bus caravan will be in your neighborhood soon.

Officials announced recently that its expanded (now 12 stops) state-wide Cyclone Tailgate Tour has been finalized.

The particulars: 12 communities… 6 dates… 1 Cy… unlimited fun with coaches and student-athletes.

In its fifth season, the Cyclone Tailgate Tour retains its kid and family friendly feel. Admission is free.

At the lunch events, attendees can get a bite to eat, shake a few hands and hear comments from key Cyclone dignitaries. The evening gatherings feature, tailgate type food for purchase, inflatable attractions and lots of Cyclone cheer.

Every year the tour gets bigger and better. Count this column as another "save the date" reminder. Here are the stops:

May 11 – Pella, Vermeer Global Pavilion (noon)

May 11 – Cedar Rapids, U.S. Cellular Center (5:30 p.m.)

May 12 – Dubuque, Grand River Center (noon)
May 12 – Davenport, River Center (5:30 p.m.)
May 24 – Osceola, Terrible’s Lakeside Casino (noon)
May 24 – Waterloo, National Cattle Congress (5:30 p.m.)
May 25 – Charles City, Floyd County Fairgrounds (noon)
May 25 – Clear Lake, Surf Ballroom (5:30 p.m.)
June 6 – Carroll, Carroll Country Club (11:30 a.m.)
June 6 – Okoboji, Arnold’s Park Amusement Park (5:30 p.m.)
June 7 – Sioux City, site TBA (noon)
June 7 – Omaha, Henry Doorly Zoo (6 p.m.)

If you have questions about the Tailgate Tour, call (515) 294-5022. Go Cyclones!


Email feedback is welcome at
2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

The positive impact of a foreign tour

Successful teams generally get along well. Sometimes, a significant experience bonds the group. Nurturing the team aspect is tricky, especially when a lot of new faces are integrated.

The 2012 Iowa State men’s basketball team will feature nine players, who have never played in a college game for the Cyclones. It’s a combination of transfers and new recruits.
 

Coach Fred Hoiberg and his club will travel this August to Italy for 4-5 games  against local professional teams. The Cyclones also get 10 practices before the tour.
 

"This trip will definitely give us a head start," Hoiberg said, "and the big thing is the 10 extra days of practice."


A by-product of the trip is the amount of time they’ll spend with one another while touring and playing. International trips often set the table for future success. I’m familiar with three such trips personally.


While I was serving as the men’s basketball SID at Iowa in the mid-1980s, the Hawkeyes travelled to China in advance of Tom Davis’ first season as head coach. Iowa went 30-5 that season and Davis felt the overseas trip kick started the process.


My wife is the former Sports Information Director at Illinois and one of the teams she worked with went to Australia in 1999. The Illini had won 14 games in the season before the trip. After a couple of weeks together in Australia, Illinois returned home and went onto earn an NCAA Tournament berth.


In the fall of 2007, after Drake’s Tom Davis had passed the coaching baton to his son (Keno), the Bulldogs took a four-game tour of the Bahamas. Drake, which was 17-15 in 2006-07 gained some momentum from their trip and recorded a school-record 28 wins in Keno’s first season. The development of Adam Emmenecker (the eventual Valley Player of the Year) came during the trip.


There are no guarantees of on-court success after foreign trips. But, my personal experience with these tours is surely a positive indicator.


Email feedback is welcome at
2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

Jimmer, Ivy or Maravich could have helped Monday

Ivyact

Jimmer Fredette won the 2011 Naismith Award Monday, given to the top college men’s basketball player in the nation.

I had not seen him play often this season other than BYU’s tournament elimination game against Florida when he took 29 shots.

It seemed like he shot a lot all season long. In looking at his stat line – 765 shots in 37 games, an average of 21 shots per game – he did shoot a lot.

Thirty-five years ago, Hercle "Poison" Ivy was shooting a lot for the Cyclones. He launched 692 attempts in a 26-game season in 1974-75. Ivy averaged 26.6 shots per game.

Fredette made 9.4 shots per game this season and Ivy connected on more than 12 per game in ’75. For comparison sake, Butler made 12 shots in the NCAA Championship game Monday.

I liked Ivy as a kid and pretended I was him in driveway shooting games.

Ivy won’t be confused with Fredette. Much different players in much different eras.

As I was thinking about Jimmer’s freedom and willingness to shoot, images of "Pistol" Pete Maravich also came to mind. Maravich was the second ever winner of the Naismith Award in 1970.

That year, Pete played in 31 games and shot 1,168 times. He took nearly 38 shots per game. And, he made 16.7 per game.

The winner of Monday night’s championship game – UConn – made 19 shots. I think a dose of Fredette, Ivy or Maravich might have spiced up that Butler-UConn battle just a bit.

Email feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

Shooting prowess of the Cyclones impressive

Fred6-twolves

There must have been some good teaching and some good learning in the Sukup Basketball Complex this year.

Undergrad or graduate, man or woman, short or tall … it really didn’t matter. The Cyclones, last winter, had some shooters. Consider:

Fred Hoiberg. He’s competed in a season-long free throw shooting competition in a promotion sponsored by the American Heart Association. Hoiberg reached the finals, which have not yet been staged, by making an amazing 227 of 228 free throws. That included 102 consecutive makes in a tie-breaker against former Indiana guard Steve Alford.

Kelsey Bolte. She participated in a three-point shooting contest at last weekend’s Final Four and finished second in the star-studded field. She had the best first-round score and advanced to the finals against the NCAA’s leading shooter, Cerie Mosgrove (UMass).

Scott Christopherson. He led the Big 12 in three pointers made, hit at least one shot from long distance in a school-record 34 games and finished 11th nationally in percentage last season.

Anna Prins. The 6-foot-7 sophomore made 36.5% of her three pointers, which would have ranked 80th nationally with enough attempts. Of the top 150 shooters nationally, none were within four inches of Prins. She was arguably the top shooting center in the nation.

Jamie Vanderbeken. ISU’s 6-11 forward, made 42.5% of his 153 three pointers (which would have ranked 19th nationally with sufficient attempts). No one among the top 75 were within four inches of him. Again, the case could be made he was the most accurate big man (from distance) in the NCAA.

Additionally, the Iowa State men smashed their school record for season 3′s by making 275 last year (old mark was 236) and the Cyclone women were 12th nationally in three-point percentage.

Both coaching staffs emphasize the 3-point shot and there appears to be a good reason why. ISU can make them.

Email feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

Coaching search coverage questioned by some

Missouri, as of Monday morning, did not officially have a men’s basketball coach (although Twitterville heated up again Sunday night with Frank Haith).

The University of Missouri-Columbia does have a School of Journalism, and it receives accolades annually. It is among the Top 10 in many national rankings and tops several of those lists. The school was founded in 1908, which makes it the nation’s oldest.

That’s why this article about news coverage of the Tigers’ search to find Mike Anderson’s replacement is so interesting. Mizzou’s reputation for teaching journalism is strong. The mis-reporting last week about Matt Painter’s supposed move to Columbia left a number of people frustrated and some were trying to explain what has happened to their industry.

The 24-hour news cycle is good and bad. Readers today, it seems, want something to react to and “retweet” or “like”. Accuracy, in the reader’s mind, is preferred but not required.

I’m not condemning the way it is today. The audience has to demand accuracy above rumor and nothing short of that will change anything. Since hearsay sells and errors are quickly swept away by new information, the cycle keeps repeating.

The article in the Columbia paper is interesting. Take a few minutes to read it. By the time you’re done, Mizzou may have its coach. Or, there will likely be another rumor by then.


Email feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

 

 

Personal file: the positive impact of foreign tours

Team11cal3

Successful teams generally get along well. Sometimes, a significant experience bonds the group. Nurturing the team aspect is tricky, especially when a lot of new faces are integrated.

The 2012 Iowa State men’s basketball team will feature nine players, who have never played in a college game for the Cyclones. It’s a combination of transfers and new recruits.

Coach Fred Hoiberg and his club will travel this August to Italy for 4-5 games  against local professional teams. The Cyclones also get 10 practices before the tour.

"This trip will definitely give us a head start," Hoiberg said, "and the big thing is the 10 extra days of practice."

A by-product of the trip is the amount of time they’ll spend with one another while touring and playing. International trips often set the table for future success. I’m familiar with three such trips personally.

While I was serving as the men’s basketball SID at Iowa in the mid-1980s, the Hawkeyes travelled to China in advance of Tom Davis’ first season as head coach. Iowa went 30-5 that season and Davis felt the overseas trip kick started the process.

My wife is the former Sports Information Director at Illinois and one of the teams she worked with went to Australia in 1999. The Illini had won 14 games in the season before the trip. After a couple of weeks together in Australia, Illinois returned home and went onto earn an NCAA Tournament berth.

In the fall of 2007, after Drake’s Tom Davis had passed the coaching baton to his son (Keno), the Bulldogs took a four-game tour of the Bahamas. Drake, which was 17-15 in 2006-07 gained some momentum from their trip and recorded a school-record 28 wins in Keno’s first season. The development of Adam Emmenecker (the eventual Valley Player of the Year) came during the trip.

There are no guarantees of on-court success after foreign trips. But, my personal experience with these tours is surely a positive indicator.

Email feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow