The Big 12 has 50% more players in the NBA Conference Finals than any other league.

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A strong case can be made that the best men’s college basketball played last season was in the Big 12. No conference in the nation had three schools – Kansas, Missouri and Baylor – that spent as many weeks in the Associated Press Top Ten as the Big 12.

Apparently, that success isn’t limited to just the past season either. Former Big 12 players dominate the rosters of teams in the NBA conference finals (OKC, SA, MIA and BOS).

In other words, the Big 12 has sent the most players to the best teams in the NBA.

Rosters for those four NBA teams include only three players from the Pac-12, five from the Big Ten and ACC, six from the Big East and eight from the SEC.

The conference with the most players on the rosters of the Thunder, Spurs, Heat and Celtics is the Big 12 with a dozen. That includes starters from Boston (Paul Pierce), Oklahoma City (Kevin Durant) and Miami (Mario Chalmers).

Standing up for the excellence in the Big 12 is pretty easy. All you have to do is state the facts.

Reader feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me on Twitter at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

Hoiberg signs eight-year contract with Cyclones Tuesday

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Fred Hoiberg is staying home.

Hoiberg signed an eight-year contract today to coach the men’s basketball team at Iowa State.

The contract announcement means Hoiberg has committed to continue building a competitive basketball program at ISU.

Hoiberg, the former NBA player likes to tell a story about his Minnesota Timberwolves’ playing days. The team did player features on the video board.

One of the questions asked was “what’s your favorite vacation spot?” Most of his teammates answered places like the French Riviera, Hawaii or Europe.

Hoiberg’s response was “Ames.” That’s the fondness he has for home.

The former Cyclone All-American treasures the lifestyle in Ames and looks forward to many more years on the Iowa State sideline. His contract signing today solidifies that ISU future.

Reader feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me on Twitter at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

Bowlsby’s on-campus administrative experience is a huge asset for the Big 12.

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During a period of great change in intercollegiate athletics the last couple of years, it has become apparent that commissioners Mike Slive (SEC), Jim Delany (Big Ten) and Larry Scott (Pac-12) have been major powerbrokers.

Bob Bowlsby is joining that group in his role as Big 12 Commissioner.

During his time as a university Athletics Director, Bowlsby worked alongside both Delany and Scott. To say Bowlsby wasn’t observing their actions would underestimate the visionary approach of the soon-to-be Big 12 commissioner.

Delany has a legal background and worked in the rules compliance area of the NCAA earlier in his career. Scott, a former pro tennis player, climbed the administrative ranks of the Women’s Tennis Association before joining the Pac-12. Slive also worked in NCAA compliance and is the only one of the three with campus A.D. experience (albeit just two years at Cornell).

Bowlsby has a college athletics administrative background. His recent track record is six years at Stanford, the most successful total sports program in the nation. No one has married athletics excellence with academic prowess better than the Cardinal.

“Having had campus experience recently causes me to look at issues differently than Larry or Jim or Mike,” Bowlsby said recently. “I think that may allow me to be a productive contributor to discussions (about the future landscape of college athletics) going forward.”

There is no question that a keen understanding of athletics and its place on campus will be valuable as the Big 12 charts its future. Bowlsby has been in the trenches and that perspective should be a huge asset as the landscape of college athletics continues to shift.

Reader feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me on Twitter at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

Familiarity with the Big 12 is a big plus for Bowlsby as he assumes commissioner’s role.

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Bob Bowlsby has a familiarity with the Big 12. That comes with the territory having served as a Director of Athletics for more than a quarter century.

“I know every institution in this league and have been on every campus,” Bowlsby said in his opening news conference.

That includes soon-to-be-minted league members TCU and West Virginia.

While at Stanford, Bowlsby said the Cardinal played the Horned Frogs in football twice and he came away impressed. The most celebrated student-athlete at Stanford the last two years was quarterback Andrew Luck, the son of Mountaineer A.D. Oliver Luck.

Bowlsby also mentioned that his college wrestling days touched league campuses.

“I wrestled in Gallagher Hall (at Oklahoma State) and the old men’s gym at Iowa State,” Bowlsby said. “(Beyond my personal familiarity) this league’s tremendous history is front-of-mind for me. I’m very excited and bullish about the future of the Big 12.”

Bowlsby takes the leadership reins in mid-June. But, the wheels are already turning and changing the perception of the Big 12 is foremost on his mind.

“It must be an early initiative to make it known broadly that we’re (stable) and that the future of the conference is exceedingly bright.”

Bowlsby will hit the ground running and his familiarity with the institutions and the issues will shorten his transition phase.

Reader feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me on Twitter at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

Familiarity with the Big 12 is a plus for Bowlsby as he’ll hit the ground running

B_big12logo

Bob Bowlsby has a familiarity with the Big 12. That comes with the territory having served as a Director of Athletics for more than a quarter century.

“I know every institution in this league and have been on every campus,” Bowlsby said in his opening news conference.

That includes soon-to-be-minted league members TCU and West Virginia.

While at Stanford, Bowlsby said the Cardinal played the Horned Frogs in football twice and he came away impressed. The most celebrated student-athlete at Stanford the last two years was quarterback Andrew Luck, the son of Mountaineer A.D. Oliver Luck.

Bowlsby also mentioned that his college wrestling days touched league campuses.

“I wrestled in Gallagher Hall (at Oklahoma State) and the old men’s gym at Iowa State,” Bowlsby said. “(Beyond my personal familiarity) this league’s tremendous history is front-of-mind for me. I’m very excited and bullish about the future of the Big 12.”

Bowlsby takes the leadership reins in mid-June. But, the wheels are already turning and changing the perception of the Big 12 is foremost on his mind.

“It must be an early initiative to make it known broadly that we’re (stable) and that the future of the conference is exceedingly bright.”

Bowlsby will hit the ground running and his familiarity with the institutions and the issues will shorten his transition phase.

Reader feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me on Twitter at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

Cyclone men & women overcome odds as northern school to make golf field

Mark Wilson, who has won more than $12.7 million on the PGA TOUR, was college golf’s player of the year in 1996.

That was 16 years ago. That was also the last time (prior to Monday) the Iowa State men’s and women’s golf teams both qualified for the NCAA Tournament.

The 37th ranked Cyclone women’s team begins play in the NCAA West Regional Thursday and the men’s squad received its invite to the NCAA Bowling Green Regional Monday.

Coaches Christie Martens and Andrew Tank should take a bow.

When Martens was named head women’s coach in 2005, the ISU women were rated 60th nationally by Golfweek. Today, they are 37th and playing in the regional meet for the third year in a row.

When Tank assumed the reins of the men’s program two years, the Cyclone men were No. 89 in the nation by Golfweek. Today, they are 58th and playing in the regional competition for the first time since 1999.

Advancing to regional play on both the men’s and women’s sides for a northern school puts Iowa State in select company. The only institutions with both teams participating in the 2012 NCAA Regional Championship that are farther north than ISU are Oregon and Washington.

The year-round good weather in the south certainly lends itself to good play. The afore-mentioned Wilson, however, learned to play golf growing up in Wisconsin.

And, the Iowa State’s golf programs are adding to the notion that there is great golf in the north.

Reader feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me on Twitter at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

Quantity of NFL picks is irrelevant unless compared to wins, too

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College sports information offices around the nation were buzzing with news from the 2012 NFL Draft last week.

Reams of statistics, touting who had the most picks and which conference led with first-round selections, cluttered Twitter.

But, there probably isn’t one college coach in the nation with a clause in his contract stating a bonus plan for number of players drafted. Yet, this data is collected and shared relentlessly.

Someone is trying to make it relevant. What’s really relevant is whether your coach is leading your program to wins, championships or bowls and doing so within the rules while graduating players.

With that as background, I counted the number of NFL Draft picks and the winning percentages (over the last three years) for every AQ conference school plus Notre Dame. Then, the lists were contrasted.

Which schools won the most with the fewest number of draft picks? In other words, who is doing the most with the least?

Here’s the Top 10 in order: Kansas State (28th in win%, 59th in NFL picks), Missouri, Auburn, Texas Tech, Oregon, Oklahoma State, Rutgers, Arkansas, West Virginia, Iowa State (tie) and Georgia Tech (tie).

Which schools won the least with the most number of draft picks? In other words, who is doing the least with the most?

Here’s the Top 10 in order: Illinois (52nd in win%, 18th in NFL picks), Cal, Miami, Georgia, Tennessee, Colorado, North Carolina (tie), Clemson (tie), Baylor (tie) and Wake Forest.

Reader feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me on Twitter at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow

Quantity of NFL Draft picks is irrelevant unless compared to win totals, too

Osemele_kelechi_osu2011-1

College sports information offices around the nation were buzzing with news from the 2012 NFL Draft last week.

Reams of statistics, touting who had the most picks and which conference led with first-round selections, cluttered Twitter.

But, there probably isn’t one college coach in the nation with a clause in his contract stating a bonus plan for number of players drafted. Yet, this data is collected and shared relentlessly.

Someone is trying to make it relevant. What’s really relevant is whether your coach is leading your program to wins, championships or bowls and doing so within the rules while graduating players.

With that as background, I counted the number of NFL Draft picks and the winning percentages (over the last three years) for every AQ conference school plus Notre Dame. Then, the lists were contrasted.

Which schools won the most with the fewest number of draft picks? In other words, who is doing the most with the least?

Here’s the Top 10 in order: Kansas State (28th in win%, 59th in NFL picks), Missouri, Auburn, Texas Tech, Oregon, Oklahoma State, Rutgers, Arkansas, West Virginia, Iowa State (tie) and Georgia Tech (tie).

Which schools won the least with the most number of draft picks? In other words, who is doing the least with the most?

Here’s the Top 10 in order: Illinois (52nd in win%, 18th in NFL picks), Cal, Miami, Georgia, Tennessee, Colorado, North Carolina (tie), Clemson (tie), Baylor (tie) and Wake Forest.

Reader feedback is welcome at 2minutetimeout@iastate.edu. You can also follow me on Twitter at: twitter.com/SteveMalchow